Google Chrome to Disable Third Party HTTP Cookies for Millions of Users in 2024

Google Chrome is set to make a major change that will impact millions of people. As part of a larger effort to phase out...
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Google Chrome to Disable Third Party HTTP Cookies for Millions of Users in 2024

Google Chrome is set to make a major change that will impact millions of people. As part of a larger effort to phase out this type of tracking technology altogether, Chrome will begin removing third-party HTTP cookies for a small percentage of users in early 2024.

How do third-party HTTP cookies work?

The cookies websites store on your computer or device are small files. The third-party HTTP cookie is set by a website other than the one you are currently visiting. It tracks your online activity, such as the pages you visit and links you click. A third-party HTTP cookie, for instance, might be set by an advertising company if you read an article on a news website, which tracks your activity across different websites.

What is the reason for Google disabling third-party HTTP cookies?

In order to protect user privacy, Google is disabling third-party HTTP cookies. The use of third-party cookies has been criticized for tracking users without their consent and building detailed profiles of their online activities. Using this information, advertisers can target users with ads or other forms of tracking online.

Is this a good or bad thing for users?

A user’s experience will vary depending on how Google’s decision impacts them. Some users may notice that some websites do not work as well as they used to. If users disable third-party cookies, some websites may require them to log in more frequently. Users will, however, likely not notice any difference in their browsing experience.

Is there anything else we need to do?

Chrome users will gradually be removed from third-party HTTP cookies by 2024, and Google is also developing alternative tracking technologies that do not compromise user privacy. These technologies, such as Google Drive, Privacy Sandbox, are still in the early stages of development, but could eventually replace third-party HTTP cookies altogether.

You should also keep in mind the following:

  • As Firefox and Safari have already done, Google Chrome is not the only web browser disabling third-party HTTP cookies.

  • Third-party HTTP cookies can be disabled, but you will still be tracked online. For example, websites can track you using fingerprinting or browser history.

  • By using a privacy-focused browser or installing a privacy extension, you can take steps to protect your privacy online.